Managing Your Health In a Post-COVID-19 World

 Regardless of how Covid-19 has affected your personal health, chances are that it has made a difference in the health care you receive and are able to access. 

We asked Dan Carlin, M.D., CEO and founder of concierge telemedical practice WorldClinic, for some of the biggest health care-related lessons that he thinks will come out of the pandemic and the implications for all of us going forward. 

COVID’S LASTING EFFECT ON HEALTH CARE DELIVERY AND ACCESS 

When Covid first hit, and then later when it resurged, many medical offices and primary care facilities across the country were essentially closed to anyone who wasn’t infected with the virus. Routine checkup visits, preventive care treatments and elective procedures were pushed off. Maybe you had to delay some test or procedure during the past year and a half—or you felt uncomfortable being in a doctor’s office, clinic or emergency room during the worst periods of Covid. 

If you think such delays are a thing of the past, think again, says Carlin, who believes we may never fully return to “normal” health care delivery again. “We don’t need a pandemic for the system to become unavailable to you,” he says. Two key reasons why: 

Fewer physicians. Many health care professionals—including highly experienced physicians—decided to leave the industry entirely in the wake of Covid, due in part to the workload and stress they experienced trying to care for so many patients as the virus surged and surged again. 

The wave of aging baby boomers. The demand side of health care is ramping up like never before. Baby boomers will need more and more health care as they age into their 70s and beyond—and likely live longer than past generations. Additionally, medical advances will create greater demand for elective procedures—just as there will be fewer doctors to perform them. Perhaps most troubling: The sheer size of the boomer demographic (72 million) will likely create significant problems in terms of access to care. With so many older Americans needing so much health care, Medicare will be strained—likely resulting in waiting lists, denials for service and health care that doesn’t measure up to previous levels of quality. 

As Carlin puts it: “Covid is a shock to the system—a hurricane. But hurricanes end. The boomers will be a systematic strain on the system for decades—like a drought that seems to never end.” 

TAKING CHARGE OF YOUR OWN CARE 

Carlin’s message: It’s time for individuals to take charge of not just their health but also their health care, rather than assume that the health care system will be an easy-to-tap resource. That can be much easier said than done in a health care model that benefits from keeping patients in a state of sickness to boost the bottom line. 

Some action steps to consider: 

Embrace telehealth. Telemedicine and remote care were vitally important for many patients throughout the pandemic when physical locations were closed. Patients and providers exchange information through online video chats, emails and phone calls. In its most advanced form, telemedicine allows doctors to monitor their patients’ health and vitals remotely using technology. This approach is designed to help make access to health care easier and faster. 

Consider concierge practices. Essentially, concierge medicine is a membership model: For a fee—concierge practices don’t accept insurance in most cases—you get access to medical practices with relatively small ratios of patients to physicians. The results can include shorter wait times, longer visits and significantly more personalized care. It also means that care may be far less likely to be denied or watered down in the name of profits. 

Manage your own risk. In an overburdened, understaffed health care environment, Carlin recommends becoming your own primary care provider as much as possible by both making better health decisions and working with providers to track key metrics that can help you get a more personalized picture of your health risks. 

The good news: There are workarounds that can help you become a more powerful advocate for yourself as a recipient of health care services and improve your health. 

The obvious key metrics and procedures are the ones you can track and manage largely by yourself—including your weight, the number of steps you take each day, your blood pressure, home breast exams, sleep habits and so on. Work with a provider to track how these and similar metrics change over time. These include foundational tests and screenings that should be done regularly (such as blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, mammograms and fasting blood sugar). 

Also, home in on data and tests that are especially important to you. Thanks to the ability to map the human genome as well as a better ability to identify ancestors’ ailments, it’s easier than ever to determine your most pertinent health risks. Armed with that information, you can set out to track the metrics that matter most in your life. Say, for example, your family history reveals that the men tend to die from heart disease in their 70s. You might work with your provider to do regular targeted cardiac screenings such as a high-sensitivity CRP test (a blood test that reveals how much plaque you have throughout your vascular system). 

Ultimately, the look and feel of health care may be significantly different in the years to come. By preparing yourself today, you can better navigate that transition—and put yourself in the best possible position to get the care you want and need. 

Fidato Wealth LLC is a Registered Investment Adviser. This brochure is solely for informational purposes. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Fidato Wealth LLC and its representatives are properly licensed or exempt from licensure. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Investing involves risk and possible loss of principal capital. No advice may be rendered by Fidato Wealth LLC unless a client service agreement is in place. Copyright 2018 by AES Nation, LLC. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are notified that any review, copying, distribution or use of this transmission is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmission in error, please (i) notify the sender immediately by e-mail or by telephone and (ii) destroy all copies of this message. Please note that trading instructions through email, fax or voicemail will not be taken, as your identity and timely retrieval of instructions cannot be guaranteed.  If you do not wish to receive marketing emails from this sender, please send an email to sayhello@fidatowealth.com.

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The Surprising Power of Connectedness

It seems like everyone wants to know what it takes to live fulfilling lives, foster happier families, create and manage stronger teams, and have happier clients. And why not? Can you imagine a life where all those outcomes are a reality?

The good news: There’s a way to pursue those results that research has shown works. The key to it all is connectedness—a concept pioneered and championed by world-renowned psychiatrist Dr. Ned Hallowell. Connectedness is the feeling of being part of something larger than yourself that matters to you. It can be a major driver of your success in your life, your work and (if you’re an entrepreneur) your company.

Connectedness is one of those topics that can look “soft” on the surface but is in fact rooted in science and research.

The warmth of relationships throughout life has the greatest positive impact on life satisfaction, according to the Grant Study.

People who are isolated face a 50 percent greater risk of premature death than those who have stronger social connections, according to the T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Lack of connection with others can damage the immune system, according to a study out of the University of California, Los Angeles.

There are three elements of connectedness that Dr. Hallowell suggests we all focus on.

CONNECT WITH YOURSELF

Do you find that you focus more on your negative traits and perceived shortcomings than on the positive characteristics you possess and display to the world around you? This is a common habit of successful people—however, it’s one that can sap life of its joy at work and at home.

Try taking the following steps:

Make a list of 12 adjectives that describe you. Draw a rectangle around the one that you’d like to change or modify. Draw circles around the three that you are most proud of. Then write down one thing you did in the past year that makes you feel proud of yourself.

Write one sentence to your favorite teacher or coach from the past; tell that person how he or she helped you. Just bringing that person to mind will help create a sense of connection and strengthen your ability to feel and show appreciation.

Ultimately, what you write isn’t as important as simply doing these exercises. The actions themselves increase your connectedness with yourself.

People who did these exercises report that doing so helped them prioritize what matters most to them, that sharing their lives with others felt more important than being ambitious and that they felt joyful afterward.

CONNECT WITH YOUR TEAM

Your team could be the people you supervise at work, or it could be the people you partner with in a group (charitable, political, social, etc.). Teams that are connected have members who trust each other deeply and who communicate with openness and candor—not with secrets and backstabbing.

Connected teams also have conflicts. Pushback and creative tension among teams are signs that the team members are engaged and can speak their minds freely. Connected teams also have a growth mindset—a belief that, no matter what, you can acquire the skills you need to achieve big things.

If you are in a position of power or authority on your team, lead the way in these areas. For example, encourage team members to give you feedback on your performance—if they see you making mistakes, tell them to let you know about it!

Here are two ways to start building team connectedness:

Write one sentence describing your team. In five bullet points, describe the leading strengths and weaknesses of your team. Include three strengths and two weaknesses, so that you focus more on the positive than the negative.

Write one congratulatory sentence to your team and share it with them. It might be something like “This last quarter was especially challenging, but you all put in the extra time we needed in order to hit our goal, and I really appreciate it!”

People who did these exercises reported that doing so helped remind them of all the positive attributes they have as a team and to stop overfocusing on negativity.

CONNECT WITH YOUR CLIENTS

Not surprisingly, deep connections with clients can generate huge payoffs. The more you can connect with clients, the more successful you will be at creating loyalty and convincing them to take the actions you want them to take.

Building deep connections starts when you pay attention to your clients. Connection cannot happen without attention. Your job is to get rid of the devices and distractions that block you from connecting with clients. During client interactions, close the door. Turn off the screen in front of you. Slow down. If you can, wear a headset and walk around the office so that you can focus entirely on the call, not the computer and other distractions on your desk.

You also must pay attention consistently over time—one good client meeting isn’t enough. Have regular face-to-face meetings with your clients (virtual video-based meetings if necessary). Spend time with them. Meet their children, and even their pets. Your curiosity about and interest in their lives will amaze them, because they don’t get that kind of attention from most people in their lives—especially professionals and service providers they work with.

The upshot: Be a student of your clients. Don’t be driven only by an urge to present them with facts and figures and then call it a day.

POWERFUL AND FREE

Perhaps the greatest thing about connectedness is that it’s both powerful and free for the taking. You just need to tap into it using the steps and strategies highlighted above.

Fidato Wealth LLC is a Registered Investment Adviser. This brochure is solely for informational purposes. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Fidato Wealth LLC and its representatives are properly licensed or exempt from licensure. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Investing involves risk and possible loss of principal capital. No advice may be rendered by Fidato Wealth LLC unless a client service agreement is in place. Copyright 2018 by AES Nation, LLC. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are notified that any review, copying, distribution or use of this transmission is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmission in error, please (i) notify the sender immediately by e-mail or by telephone and (ii) destroy all copies of this message. Please note that trading instructions through email, fax or voicemail will not be taken, as your identity and timely retrieval of instructions cannot be guaranteed.  If you do not wish to receive marketing emails from this sender, please send an email to sayhello@fidatowealth.com.

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Three Questions to Answer Before You Purchase Life Insurance

Life insurance can be an extremely important, even essential, part of your financial plan. One of its most attractive aspects for many individuals and families is the death benefit of the policy—the money that the insurance company pays out in the event of the insured’s death.

But navigating the life insurance landscape can be tricky—and people often make costly mistakes. Three of the biggest we see regularly:

Buying too much—or too little—insurance due to a lack of understanding of their true financial needs
Paying for life insurance using a less-than-ideal method or executing that payment method poorly
Misunderstanding life insurance’s purpose and the reasons for having it

In order to make smart life insurance decisions, there are three questions you need to ask yourself and answer.

Question #1: Why might I need life insurance?

Life insurance can be a very versatile tool, capable of replenishing an estate to cover various taxes as well as creating wealth.

That said, you may not need life insurance at all. Ultimately, there is only one reason to purchase life insurance: You lack the liquid financial resources needed to fill a financial gap if you were to die.

That gap might involve:

Family. Consider the people you love, such as your children. You want to ensure they would have a solid financial base (however you define it) if you were to die. Very often the best answer is using life insurance to create an estate for them.

Financial obligations. Life insurance proceeds can be used to pay estate taxes, enabling children or other loved ones to keep wealth that would otherwise be paid to the government. Likewise, entrepreneurs regularly use life insurance to fund buy-sell agreements with business partners. This can help ensure their families will be properly taken care of. There are also circumstances in which you might owe a person or an institution and use life insurance as a form of collateral.

Charitable impact. Many people want to support worthwhile charitable causes so they can have an impact on the world—or a chunk of it, at least. Life insurance can be used to fulfill their commitments to the philanthropic organizations they support.

Important: Be very clear about why you want life insurance. Carefully and critically think through the outcomes you are trying to achieve and the role life insurance might be able to play before you buy.

HOW MUCH, HOW TO PAY

Question #2: How much life insurance do I need?

Let’s say you determine that life insurance is something you need. It’s then time to turn to the matter of amount.

The answer to this question is based on your answer to the first question. When you know the purpose of having a death benefit, it is possible to decide just how much life insurance you need to get.

Examples: Say you are looking to create a larger estate to ensure your family would be financially secure if you died. A lot of factors can be considered to come up with an appropriate death benefit. How sophisticated you get depends on you (and any advisors you enlist for help). For example, you might create cash flow projections to determine how much money your family would need to pay for specific projected expenses (education, health care, etc.). By including projected investment returns into the calculations, you can arrive at the size of the death benefit your family would require to fund critical financial needs.

Or say you have a business you plan to pass on to your daughter. Although your son has different talents and interests, you still want to leave him an inheritance—and you want things to be “fair” for both. Life insurance can be used to equalize their inheritances. Based on the financial value of the business that you will be leaving to your daughter, you can determine how much life insurance you will need in order to leave your son a comparable amount of assets.

The upshot: Ascertaining how much insurance you require is fairly straightforward—but only once you are perfectly clear about why you need life insurance. Therefore, you should buy the amount of life insurance that matches your needs—and no more or less.

Question #3: How should I pay for my life insurance?

Once you know how much insurance you need, you can consider various ways to pay the premiums. Basically, there are four approaches to paying premiums:

Pay the premiums out of pocket. The least complicated and most direct way to pay premiums is to write checks for them as the premium notices arrive.

Have a third party pay the premiums. If you are an entrepreneur, your company might be the appropriate entity to pay the premiums. Similarly, grandparents can pay the premiums for their grandchildren. (Note: There are rules that need to be followed to enable third parties to pay life insurance premiums without adverse consequences.)

Borrow the money to pay premiums. This approach is known as premium financing. There are a number of different ways to use loans to pay premiums, but expertise in this area is often a necessity to use loans successfully.

Leverage your retirement plan to pay premiums. Business owners may be able to use funds in a qualified retirement plan to buy life insurance. A nice benefit is that pretax dollars are used to pay premiums. However, the IRS will consider the pure cost of life insurance protection provided under the plan to be an economic benefit that is taxable income to the client.*

Which one works best depends on a wide variety of factors. But the first step is to understand that you do have options to consider—don’t let anyone tell you there is only one method.

* Disclosure: A tax professional should be consulted on this matter.

Fidato Wealth LLC is a Registered Investment Adviser. This brochure is solely for informational purposes. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Fidato Wealth LLC and its representatives are properly licensed or exempt from licensure. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Investing involves risk and possible loss of principal capital. No advice may be rendered by Fidato Wealth LLC unless a client service agreement is in place. Copyright 2018 by AES Nation, LLC. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are notified that any review, copying, distribution or use of this transmission is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmission in error, please (i) notify the sender immediately by e-mail or by telephone and (ii) destroy all copies of this message. Please note that trading instructions through email, fax or voicemail will not be taken, as your identity and timely retrieval of instructions cannot be guaranteed.  If you do not wish to receive marketing emails from this sender, please send an email to sayhello@fidatowealth.com.

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Choosing an Executor for Your Estate

Here’s an uncomfortable truth you need to accept: Someday—hopefully in the very distant future—you are going to die.

The good news: You can make that moment easier on your heirs by taking a few simple steps.

One of the best ways, financially, to prepare now for that time is to choose a person to be the executor of your estate. Unfortunately, that also can be one of the more overlooked aspects of estate planning—which can spell trouble for your family and your wealth.

The CEO of your estate

Your executor is essentially the CEO of your estate—the person responsible for making sure your will is executed properly. This role can mean handling everything from distributing assets to heirs to ensuring any taxes due are paid.

In other words, your executor is a crucial player on your estate planning team.

Not surprisingly, then, people often find it difficult to choose their executor. The good news: You can choose from virtually anyone. Although in our experience, a family member is the most common option, professionals—lawyers, bankers and others—are also commonly selected. What’s more, family member executors may engage a professional for help doing the job—a move that can potentially help avoid family conflicts over assets.

Executor misconduct

There are clear circumstances where executors do not fulfill their obligations. Some of the more egregious issues we have seen include:

Withholding inheritance. There are times when an executor is not required to disburse assets, such as when debts have to be paid off first. However, when the executor is not disbursing assets in a timely manner, it can be a red flag that should be looked into.
Breach of fiduciary obligations. All executors have a fiduciary duty to act in the best interests of the deceased and the beneficiaries. For example, executors must keep records of all financial transactions and be able to show those records to the heirs. Sometimes, however, executors fail to fulfill their fiduciary duty. Even if the failure is not ill-intended, ignorance is not a valid excuse.
Stealing from the estate. There are examples of executors who have stolen funds from the estate. Access and limited oversight (or no oversight at all) can easily result in greedy people abusing their position as executor.

FOUR CONSIDERATIONS WHEN CHOOSING AN EXECUTOR

Based on all of this information, we think it makes good sense to select your executor carefully so that your wishes as laid out in your will are honored and followed.

There are a few actions that we believe can potentially help make sure your executor does a good job (see the exhibit below).

Getting what you want

1. Pick someone you trust who is willing to do the job. You need to select someone—such as a family member—in whom you have a great deal of faith. That won’t guarantee things will turn out as you want them to, but it can potentially reduce the risk of negative outcomes.

Your executor must also have the time required to do a good job, and be inclined to take on the role and all it involves. This is true even if he or she ultimately engages a professional for additional help.

Important: If choosing a trusted family member or friend isn’t an option for you, you might consider going with a corporate executor. Professionals with experience in matters relating to wills and estates can potentially do the job of executor better than an amateur—especially when complex assets and estates are involved. Note, however, that generally there are higher expenses associated with a corporate trustee.

2. Make sure the executor knows what you want to happen and respects your wishes. The idea here is to eliminate any vagueness in the will. Communicate clearly what you want to have happen. The executor must respect your wishes even if he or she disagrees with them. For example, even if you leave money to a particular cousin whom the executor despises, the executor must still disburse the funds.

While it is possible to replace an executor, it is often costly and problematic. The better approach is to carefully and explicitly specify your wishes and choose a person to be executor who will do a good job in the role by following your wishes and preferences.

3. Select someone who is likely to be around to do the job. When choosing, consider a candidate’s age and health status. After all, an executor who isn’t alive or healthy enough to administer your estate won’t do you any good. Have a relatively young and healthy executor as your first choice or as a backup.

4. Consider the person’s financial health. Candidates who have financial challenges, excessive debt or liens against them may not be good, trustworthy options.

Conclusion

If you haven’t chosen an executor, it’s a great time to take this crucial step. If you already have one but haven’t revisited the issue in years, you might consider making sure your choice is still the best for you given your situation and goals.

3. Select someone who is likely to be around

Fidato Wealth LLC is a Registered Investment Adviser. This brochure is solely for informational purposes. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Fidato Wealth LLC and its representatives are properly licensed or exempt from licensure. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Investing involves risk and possible loss of principal capital. No advice may be rendered by Fidato Wealth LLC unless a client service agreement is in place. Copyright 2018 by AES Nation, LLC. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are notified that any review, copying, distribution or use of this transmission is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmission in error, please (i) notify the sender immediately by e-mail or by telephone and (ii) destroy all copies of this message. Please note that trading instructions through email, fax or voicemail will not be taken, as your identity and timely retrieval of instructions cannot be guaranteed.  If you do not wish to receive marketing emails from this sender, please send an email to sayhello@fidatowealth.com.

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Preparing Heirs For Their Inheritance

Inheriting money comes with plenty of benefits. From being less worried about paying for life’s necessities to enjoying the luxuries affluence can bring, inheritors often find that many of life’s key stumbling blocks are no longer in their paths.

That said, an inheritance doesn’t automatically mean a worry-free life of ease. Inheriting wealth can actually create unique challenges and conflicts. A windfall can be the root of significant problems for your heirs—and therefore for you too.

Consider some of the inheritance-related issues that often crop up among the Super Rich—those people with a net worth of $500 million or more—and how they tend to address them. Their strategies can potentially inform your own action plan.

TRANSFERRING WEALTH

In our experience, we find that many wealth creators want to pass some of the results of their hard work and commitment to their children and other loved ones. Doing so involves a number of considerations:

Financial matters. The aim here is to be tax-efficient in transferring the wealth. For instance, there are different tax strategies that can be employed to mitigate intergenerational loss of family wealth.

Ensuring heirs will be smart about the money. A major concern of Super Rich wealth creators is that inheritors will misuse the wealth they are given. They believe that being given control over a large amount of money and being able to make wise decisions do not always align.

But it’s not just the wealth creators who are concerned about the ability of heirs to manage their inheritances—it’s often also the heirs. It can be easy for inheritors to mismanage their fortunes, and we find that many inheritors recognize that. That means heirs need to be well prepared for the day when they receive their inheritances.

MONEY’S IMPACT TODAY

A good starting point for understanding how inheriting wealth might affect heirs’ lives is seeing how the money is impacting them today.

Heirs should consider their answers to questions such as:

Is wealth a source of terrific possibilities, a source of horrific problems or some combination of the two?
◼ How is money affecting your life?
◼ Is wealth the cause of serious relationship problems? If so, what and with whom are they?
To what extent do you define yourself by your family money? What would happen if the money vanished?

In addition, parents should assess the ability of their children to manage their inheritances. If the children are not up to the job, what steps need to be taken to ensure they are capable and will not waste their inheritances?

INVESTOR EDUCATION IS A MUST

Chances are, there will be a range among heirs in terms of their ability to intelligently and prudently handle significant wealth. That means different heirs will probably need different approaches to wealth education in order to best handle their inheritances.

Not surprisingly, there are many different ideas about how best to teach heirs to manage money. For example, some professionals strive to educate heirs on the intricacies of wealth management. However, we find that most inheritors are not interested in these types of details.

An approach we find much more effective across all types of inheritors is to focus on how to be responsible for their wealth. This means giving them a good understanding of the bigger picture. By knowing what they want to achieve financially and being attuned to what is going on with their money, they can make more informed decisions.

One important aspect of being responsible for their wealth is giving heirs the ability to effectively select and work with professionals such as lawyers, accountants and wealth managers. Part of that means empowering heirs to know how to avoid the “pretenders”—professionals who may want to do a good job for their clients but lack the requisite skills. Pretenders can be detrimental to heirs’ financial well-being.

More problematic—especially if heirs receive significant sums—is the possibility of being exploited by predators, grifters and the like. Significant wealth is a magnet for all manner of financial predators, so having the skills to identify such people before they do harm is really a necessity for most inheritors.

Even if the assets are in trust, heirs are best served if they understand how the trusts have been set up and what they’re designed to accomplish. That way, heirs can better ensure that what is going on in the trust is what is supposed to be happening.

Increasingly, wealthy families are making concerted efforts to teach future inheritors how to evaluate and oversee the work of the professionals they will rely on.

Additionally, there may be a need to discuss issues of money and self-esteem—as new wealth can produce feelings of anxiety and even worthlessness among some inheritors. Delving into ideas that help separate people’s wealth from their overall sense of self can help foster a more comfortable relationship between an inheritor and his or her inheritance.

Lessons for All of Us

Of course, you don’t have to be anywhere near the Super Rich level of affluence to benefit from getting your heirs ready to receive an inheritance from you someday.

The key is to get going well before the day comes when assets are transferred. Encourage heirs to think about their views, values and attitudes toward money and wealth—and how those might change if their bottom line suddenly had additional zeros. In particular, help them understand some financial basics and smart ways to size up any professionals they may encounter down the road.

Armed with self-awareness and a strong foundation of financial knowledge, your heirs potentially can get the most from their inheritance.

Fidato Wealth LLC is a Registered Investment Adviser. This brochure is solely for informational purposes. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Fidato Wealth LLC and its representatives are properly licensed or exempt from licensure. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Investing involves risk and possible loss of principal capital. No advice may be rendered by Fidato Wealth LLC unless a client service agreement is in place. Copyright 2018 by AES Nation, LLC. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are notified that any review, copying, distribution or use of this transmission is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmission in error, please (i) notify the sender immediately by e-mail or by telephone and (ii) destroy all copies of this message. Please note that trading instructions through email, fax or voicemail will not be taken, as your identity and timely retrieval of instructions cannot be guaranteed.  If you do not wish to receive marketing emails from this sender, please send an email to sayhello@fidatowealth.com.

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