Choosing an Executor for Your Estate

Here’s an uncomfortable truth you need to accept: Someday—hopefully in the very distant future—you are going to die.

The good news: You can make that moment easier on your heirs by taking a few simple steps.

One of the best ways, financially, to prepare now for that time is to choose a person to be the executor of your estate. Unfortunately, that also can be one of the more overlooked aspects of estate planning—which can spell trouble for your family and your wealth.

The CEO of your estate

Your executor is essentially the CEO of your estate—the person responsible for making sure your will is executed properly. This role can mean handling everything from distributing assets to heirs to ensuring any taxes due are paid.

In other words, your executor is a crucial player on your estate planning team.

Not surprisingly, then, people often find it difficult to choose their executor. The good news: You can choose from virtually anyone. Although in our experience, a family member is the most common option, professionals—lawyers, bankers and others—are also commonly selected. What’s more, family member executors may engage a professional for help doing the job—a move that can potentially help avoid family conflicts over assets.

Executor misconduct

There are clear circumstances where executors do not fulfill their obligations. Some of the more egregious issues we have seen include:

Withholding inheritance. There are times when an executor is not required to disburse assets, such as when debts have to be paid off first. However, when the executor is not disbursing assets in a timely manner, it can be a red flag that should be looked into.
Breach of fiduciary obligations. All executors have a fiduciary duty to act in the best interests of the deceased and the beneficiaries. For example, executors must keep records of all financial transactions and be able to show those records to the heirs. Sometimes, however, executors fail to fulfill their fiduciary duty. Even if the failure is not ill-intended, ignorance is not a valid excuse.
Stealing from the estate. There are examples of executors who have stolen funds from the estate. Access and limited oversight (or no oversight at all) can easily result in greedy people abusing their position as executor.

FOUR CONSIDERATIONS WHEN CHOOSING AN EXECUTOR

Based on all of this information, we think it makes good sense to select your executor carefully so that your wishes as laid out in your will are honored and followed.

There are a few actions that we believe can potentially help make sure your executor does a good job (see the exhibit below).

Getting what you want

1. Pick someone you trust who is willing to do the job. You need to select someone—such as a family member—in whom you have a great deal of faith. That won’t guarantee things will turn out as you want them to, but it can potentially reduce the risk of negative outcomes.

Your executor must also have the time required to do a good job, and be inclined to take on the role and all it involves. This is true even if he or she ultimately engages a professional for additional help.

Important: If choosing a trusted family member or friend isn’t an option for you, you might consider going with a corporate executor. Professionals with experience in matters relating to wills and estates can potentially do the job of executor better than an amateur—especially when complex assets and estates are involved. Note, however, that generally there are higher expenses associated with a corporate trustee.

2. Make sure the executor knows what you want to happen and respects your wishes. The idea here is to eliminate any vagueness in the will. Communicate clearly what you want to have happen. The executor must respect your wishes even if he or she disagrees with them. For example, even if you leave money to a particular cousin whom the executor despises, the executor must still disburse the funds.

While it is possible to replace an executor, it is often costly and problematic. The better approach is to carefully and explicitly specify your wishes and choose a person to be executor who will do a good job in the role by following your wishes and preferences.

3. Select someone who is likely to be around to do the job. When choosing, consider a candidate’s age and health status. After all, an executor who isn’t alive or healthy enough to administer your estate won’t do you any good. Have a relatively young and healthy executor as your first choice or as a backup.

4. Consider the person’s financial health. Candidates who have financial challenges, excessive debt or liens against them may not be good, trustworthy options.

Conclusion

If you haven’t chosen an executor, it’s a great time to take this crucial step. If you already have one but haven’t revisited the issue in years, you might consider making sure your choice is still the best for you given your situation and goals.

3. Select someone who is likely to be around

Fidato Wealth LLC is a Registered Investment Adviser. This brochure is solely for informational purposes. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Fidato Wealth LLC and its representatives are properly licensed or exempt from licensure. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Investing involves risk and possible loss of principal capital. No advice may be rendered by Fidato Wealth LLC unless a client service agreement is in place. Copyright 2018 by AES Nation, LLC. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are notified that any review, copying, distribution or use of this transmission is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmission in error, please (i) notify the sender immediately by e-mail or by telephone and (ii) destroy all copies of this message. Please note that trading instructions through email, fax or voicemail will not be taken, as your identity and timely retrieval of instructions cannot be guaranteed.  If you do not wish to receive marketing emails from this sender, please send an email to sayhello@fidatowealth.com.

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Preparing Heirs For Their Inheritance

Inheriting money comes with plenty of benefits. From being less worried about paying for life’s necessities to enjoying the luxuries affluence can bring, inheritors often find that many of life’s key stumbling blocks are no longer in their paths.

That said, an inheritance doesn’t automatically mean a worry-free life of ease. Inheriting wealth can actually create unique challenges and conflicts. A windfall can be the root of significant problems for your heirs—and therefore for you too.

Consider some of the inheritance-related issues that often crop up among the Super Rich—those people with a net worth of $500 million or more—and how they tend to address them. Their strategies can potentially inform your own action plan.

TRANSFERRING WEALTH

In our experience, we find that many wealth creators want to pass some of the results of their hard work and commitment to their children and other loved ones. Doing so involves a number of considerations:

Financial matters. The aim here is to be tax-efficient in transferring the wealth. For instance, there are different tax strategies that can be employed to mitigate intergenerational loss of family wealth.

Ensuring heirs will be smart about the money. A major concern of Super Rich wealth creators is that inheritors will misuse the wealth they are given. They believe that being given control over a large amount of money and being able to make wise decisions do not always align.

But it’s not just the wealth creators who are concerned about the ability of heirs to manage their inheritances—it’s often also the heirs. It can be easy for inheritors to mismanage their fortunes, and we find that many inheritors recognize that. That means heirs need to be well prepared for the day when they receive their inheritances.

MONEY’S IMPACT TODAY

A good starting point for understanding how inheriting wealth might affect heirs’ lives is seeing how the money is impacting them today.

Heirs should consider their answers to questions such as:

Is wealth a source of terrific possibilities, a source of horrific problems or some combination of the two?
◼ How is money affecting your life?
◼ Is wealth the cause of serious relationship problems? If so, what and with whom are they?
To what extent do you define yourself by your family money? What would happen if the money vanished?

In addition, parents should assess the ability of their children to manage their inheritances. If the children are not up to the job, what steps need to be taken to ensure they are capable and will not waste their inheritances?

INVESTOR EDUCATION IS A MUST

Chances are, there will be a range among heirs in terms of their ability to intelligently and prudently handle significant wealth. That means different heirs will probably need different approaches to wealth education in order to best handle their inheritances.

Not surprisingly, there are many different ideas about how best to teach heirs to manage money. For example, some professionals strive to educate heirs on the intricacies of wealth management. However, we find that most inheritors are not interested in these types of details.

An approach we find much more effective across all types of inheritors is to focus on how to be responsible for their wealth. This means giving them a good understanding of the bigger picture. By knowing what they want to achieve financially and being attuned to what is going on with their money, they can make more informed decisions.

One important aspect of being responsible for their wealth is giving heirs the ability to effectively select and work with professionals such as lawyers, accountants and wealth managers. Part of that means empowering heirs to know how to avoid the “pretenders”—professionals who may want to do a good job for their clients but lack the requisite skills. Pretenders can be detrimental to heirs’ financial well-being.

More problematic—especially if heirs receive significant sums—is the possibility of being exploited by predators, grifters and the like. Significant wealth is a magnet for all manner of financial predators, so having the skills to identify such people before they do harm is really a necessity for most inheritors.

Even if the assets are in trust, heirs are best served if they understand how the trusts have been set up and what they’re designed to accomplish. That way, heirs can better ensure that what is going on in the trust is what is supposed to be happening.

Increasingly, wealthy families are making concerted efforts to teach future inheritors how to evaluate and oversee the work of the professionals they will rely on.

Additionally, there may be a need to discuss issues of money and self-esteem—as new wealth can produce feelings of anxiety and even worthlessness among some inheritors. Delving into ideas that help separate people’s wealth from their overall sense of self can help foster a more comfortable relationship between an inheritor and his or her inheritance.

Lessons for All of Us

Of course, you don’t have to be anywhere near the Super Rich level of affluence to benefit from getting your heirs ready to receive an inheritance from you someday.

The key is to get going well before the day comes when assets are transferred. Encourage heirs to think about their views, values and attitudes toward money and wealth—and how those might change if their bottom line suddenly had additional zeros. In particular, help them understand some financial basics and smart ways to size up any professionals they may encounter down the road.

Armed with self-awareness and a strong foundation of financial knowledge, your heirs potentially can get the most from their inheritance.

Fidato Wealth LLC is a Registered Investment Adviser. This brochure is solely for informational purposes. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Fidato Wealth LLC and its representatives are properly licensed or exempt from licensure. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Investing involves risk and possible loss of principal capital. No advice may be rendered by Fidato Wealth LLC unless a client service agreement is in place. Copyright 2018 by AES Nation, LLC. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are notified that any review, copying, distribution or use of this transmission is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmission in error, please (i) notify the sender immediately by e-mail or by telephone and (ii) destroy all copies of this message. Please note that trading instructions through email, fax or voicemail will not be taken, as your identity and timely retrieval of instructions cannot be guaranteed.  If you do not wish to receive marketing emails from this sender, please send an email to sayhello@fidatowealth.com.

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Here’s Why You Need a ‘Business Plan’ for Your Family

When business owners start a new venture or seek out funding, they always create a detailed business plan first. But chances are, most parents have never once thought about creating a similar type of plan for their most important asset: their families.

Your family may not be a business, but clearly it can be a good idea to foster it like good business owners do with their companies. By taking steps to formally identify your family’s values and goals, as well as to assess the quality of the relationships you have with each other, you can start to strengthen existing bonds—and repair any bridges that are in bad shape. By actively working together toward family goals, you can instill greater resiliency, competency and life skills in your children.

Here’s why it’s so important to create family plans along the lines of highly successful business plans—along with actionable advice for creating these plans in your own life.

THE NEED FOR A FAMILY PLAN

The fact is, business plans weren’t always needed. Once upon a time, there was the one cobbler in town. But as business and trade got increasingly complex, the need to plan, prioritize and track results in business became paramount to simply staying afloat.

Likewise, family plans weren’t always necessary back when communities were more tightly knit and neighbors looked out more for each other and each other’s kids. But as that dynamic has changed over time, a few scary trends have emerged, as these statistics from the Centers for Disease Control show:

The suicide rate for girls ages 15 to 19 doubled from 2007 to 2015, when it reached its highest point in 40 years.
▪The suicide rate for boys ages 15 to 19 increased by 30 percent over the same time period.
▪ Suicide was the second leading cause of death in 2016 among Americans ages 15 to 24.

The upshot: Many children today seem to be both in pain more than in the past and unsure how to cope with their struggles. That’s why there’s a greater-than-ever need to focus on your family with a very close eye.

THREE COMPONENTS OF A SMART FAMILY PLAN

Component #1: Assessment

Before deep and impactful conversations can begin, family members have to see where they are—and aren’t—on the same page in some key areas of their relationships:

Connection. Determine how much one-on-one time you spend with your children. How engaged are you during those moments?
Understanding. Do you and your kids see eye to eye on the degree to which you seek to understand them before trying to be understood? Also, how well do your children understand important characteristics about you—your values, what you do for work, etc.?
Balancing. How well do you communicate expectations and how well do you balance your needs with family needs?
Influencing. How often do you lead by example to teach children values and behaviors? How well do you demonstrate self-care?
Empowering. How willing are you to let your children fail at something? Are you more of an encourager or a criticizer when helping your children with a task?

Vital: It’s crucial that you and your children answer these questions about you, to see how aligned or misaligned you are in these areas.

Component #2: Action

A great family plan will contain big-picture family goals that are being pursued each quarter—much like a business pursues certain objectives each fiscal quarter. Common examples include improving communication, building financial awareness in children, making smarter decisions and becoming more fit.

However, those large-scale goals need to be broken down into smaller, simpler and achievable goals. A family that wants to achieve better overall fitness might set a goal to run three 5Ks per quarter.

Important: These goals must be SMART to succeed—specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and timely.

Component #3: Accountability

Like a business plan, a family plan will accomplish little if you don’t implement it or don’t stick with it long enough to achieve the desired results. Hiring a facilitator to help you with your plan can make a lot of sense—just as hiring a personal trainer can enable you to show up at the gym on those days when you’d rather binge-watch Netflix.

That facilitator has to be neutral and objective, and shouldn’t kiss up to the parents just because they’re the ones paying for the service. The facilitator must advocate for everyone while also calling out anybody who isn’t holding up their end.

Any facilitator or coach you select should have a few other characteristics:

▪ They are direct and honest about your plan and your amount of progress.
They are objective and they examine your family as a disinterested third party—not as someone who has strong emotional ties to you.

Regardless of whether you pay someone to keep you on track, you will want to regularly review your family plan to see how everyone is progressing toward their stated goals. Determine where family members are encountering roadblocks and brainstorm about ways to overcome any hurdles.

Fidato Wealth LLC is a Registered Investment Adviser. This brochure is solely for informational purposes. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Fidato Wealth LLC and its representatives are properly licensed or exempt from licensure. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Investing involves risk and possible loss of principal capital. No advice may be rendered by Fidato Wealth LLC unless a client service agreement is in place. Copyright 2018 by AES Nation, LLC. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are notified that any review, copying, distribution or use of this transmission is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmission in error, please (i) notify the sender immediately by e-mail or by telephone and (ii) destroy all copies of this message. Please note that trading instructions through email, fax or voicemail will not be taken, as your identity and timely retrieval of instructions cannot be guaranteed.  If you do not wish to receive marketing emails from this sender, please send an email to sayhello@fidatowealth.com.

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Virtual Experiences We Think You’ll Love

When COVID-19 first hit, closures and lockdowns made virtual resources the only way to see certain sites—drawing in viewers to virtual zoo tours and the like. A Forbes article reported that the number of searches for the term “virtual tour” soared from 1,300 in February 2020 to nearly 10,000 the following month, when cities and countries began locking down.

But even though many more places and businesses are now open to the public in some form or another, it seems that virtual experiences may have staying power.

Example: In one survey, 64 percent of people said they will continue to watch or participate in online experiences even after the reopening of attractions. Nearly half (48 percent) said they will continue to watch or participate in at least one of the listed online activities in preference to going out after lockdowns are lifted.

With that in mind, we’ve compiled some of our favorite online events, tours and other experiences to help you live a richer and fuller virtual best life!

NATURE

There are loads of live camera sites that will immediately transport you to a specific spot in the natural world to see … whatever is going on there at the moment!

One example: Explore.org (explore.org/livecams) has cameras stationed in natural habitats far and wide—which as of this writing include a busy osprey nest in Montana, Brooks Falls in Katmai National Park in Alaska (where hungry black bears chase after a fish dinner) and Olifants West Game Reserve in South Africa, home to wild lions, tigers and elephants.

If you don’t want to chance it that you won’t see something interesting on a live cam, you can head north for 360-degree videos of activities in and around Fairbanks, Alaska—including a stunning Northern Lights display and a sled-dog ride that puts you right in the action (explorefairbanks.com/explore-the-area/360).

TRAVEL

That trip to Europe on hold? You can still see plenty of the old continent from your couch.

The Palace of Versailles. This virtual look of the Sun King’s jaw-dropping home and grounds is among the more comprehensive tours we found. There are video tours, VR-based experiences to have using a virtual reality headset, 360-degree walk-throughs of the Hall of Mirrors and other rooms, stunning 3D views of priceless art and artifacts, and more (artsandculture.google.com/project/versailles).

The Paris catacombs. Since you’re already near Paris, check out one of the City of Light’s most macabre tourist destinations. The famous catacombs are a network of subterranean tunnels that house the remains of more than six million people. The virtual tour practically makes you feel like you’re there (catacombes.paris.fr/visite-virtuelle).

CUISINE

Getting to our favorite restaurants has proven challenging, and occasionally impossible. But that doesn’t mean you can’t have gourmet experiences. Foodies and oenophiles can consider whetting their appetites with options like:

Interactive wine tastings. As of this writing, several wineries and wine makers—such as California’s Frog’s Leap (frogsleap.com) and St. Supery (stsupery.com)—are running online tasting sessions during which they talk about various featured bottles. Just purchase the specific wines in advance and sign up to get schooled by the very people responsible for the juice in your glass.

Cooking classes. Restaurants have struggled mightily during the pandemic, prompting some to go online and share their chefs’ secrets and techniques with the rest of us. One example that got our attention: virtual cooking classes held by Mei Mei—two-time winner of Boston’s best dumplings (www.meimeiboston.com).

ART

Google has partnered with more than 2,500 museums and galleries to offer virtual tours of their artwork (https://artsandculture.google.com/). Two we really enjoyed:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City). You can view more than 200,000 individual items from the Met’s collection along with 26 online exhibits—including behind-the-scenes looks at how the Met does what it does so well. You can even explore individual rooms of the museum, which gives you a sense of being in the building itself (artsandculture.google.com/partner/the-metropolitan-museum-of-art).

The Uffizi Gallery (Firenze, Italy). Wander the halls of this famed museum that is home to some of the most important and revered Italian Renaissance art ever created—including Botticelli’s iconic The Birth of Venus (artsandculture.google.com/partner/uffizi-gallery).

KIDS

Zoos across the country have set up live cams and other ways to experience the animals from afar. Some of these cameras were in place long before the pandemic, but they’ve become especially in demand these days. Check out these animals on view:

Beluga whale (Georgia Aquarium: georgiaaquarium.org/webcam/ocean-voyager)
Fiona the hippo (Cincinnati Zoo: www.facebook.com/cincinnatizoo)
Tigers, elephants, giraffes, etc. (San Diego Zoo: zoo.sandiegozoo.org/live-cams)

Or if you’ve got amateur spelunkers in the house, point them to the virtual tour of New Mexico’s Carlsbad Caverns. The 360-degree tour is narrated by a park ranger, who takes you into the 4,000-foot-long Big Room (artsandculture.withgoogle.com/en-us/national-parks-service/carlsbad-caverns/natural-entrance-tour).

VIRTUAL LEARNING

Don’t forget to keep that brain and body healthy. There are loads of online learning resources that have been made available lately. For example:

Ivy League classes. You can access free online courses from Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Penn, Princeton and Yale through Class Central (classcentral.com/collection/ivy-league-moocs). Among the most popular courses from these elite institutions of higher learning:

The Science of Well-Being from Yale University
▪ Machine Learning from Stanford University
▪ Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies from Harvard University
▪ Financial Markets from Yale University
▪ Introduction to Psychology from Yale University

Please note: These options were in effect as of the writing of this report. Check with each provider or resource to see whether they are still in effect. Some of the options listed in this report are free, while others may require a fee.

Fidato Wealth LLC is a Registered Investment Adviser. This brochure is solely for informational purposes. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Fidato Wealth LLC and its representatives are properly licensed or exempt from licensure. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Investing involves risk and possible loss of principal capital. No advice may be rendered by Fidato Wealth LLC unless a client service agreement is in place. Copyright 2018 by AES Nation, LLC. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are notified that any review, copying, distribution or use of this transmission is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmission in error, please (i) notify the sender immediately by e-mail or by telephone and (ii) destroy all copies of this message. Please note that trading instructions through email, fax or voicemail will not be taken, as your identity and timely retrieval of instructions cannot be guaranteed.  If you do not wish to receive marketing emails from this sender, please send an email to sayhello@fidatowealth.com.

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“We, the Family”: The Benefits of a Family Constitution

Wealth and family can be a tricky mix. Affluence can help families achieve great things and realize their shared vision, of course. But it also can create resentments and rifts that could potentially damage a family’s financial position and cause estrangement among family members.

What’s more, as wealthy families grow and expand over time, one big issue is keeping them and their shared capital together. Sometimes the wealth remains commingled because of legal structures, such as multigenerational trusts. However, family members who feel wronged in some way may take legal action to try to break such trusts—creating still greater family disharmony and possibly jeopardizing the family’s bottom line.

To avoid these and similar outcomes—and to help build and encourage family harmony—consider creating a formal family constitution. We see many Super Rich (net worth of $500 million or more) families taking this step, with positive results.

Here’s a look at family constitutions; what they are, what they do and how to create one with your own family.

 

CREATING AN EFFECTIVE FAMILY CONSTITUTION

A family constitution should, among other things, help your family equitably address issues around its wealth—which might include assets such as an operating business and properties (real estate, art) as well as invested wealth and other savings.

Specifically, a constitution should specify:

How is the wealth to be used by family members?
What limitations are there on how the wealth is spent, invested and donated?
Who makes the decisions and how are these decisions made?
How can family members provide input or impact the decision-making around the distribution and use of the wealth?

How are family members prepared to perpetuate family values and manage the family wealth?

Facilitating family harmony

A family constitution can be an effective tool for dodging serious conflicts and facilitating agreement among family members. It can help family members address their concerns and preferences constructively. Often, family constitutions also lay out the future directions and actions the family intends to take.

One of the key goals of a family constitution is to prevent the types of family conflicts that can tear families apart and diminish fortunes. The goal is to detail how the family will deal with dissent. When the specific methods for managing and dealing with family conflict are well documented and described, a family can potentially be very effective at reducing infighting. The overarching goal is to head off conflicts by promoting communication and striving for consensus among family members around their core principles, values and long-term intent.

Family constitutions recognize that there is contentiousness in nearly all families—and they aim to spell out specific ways a family can effectively address conflicts that are almost certain to arise over time and across generations.

Important: While the family constitution is a written document, it is only a set of guidelines and prescriptions. It is not, in most cases, a legal and binding document that must be adhered to.

In developing a family constitution, it’s necessary to gain consensus among family members. Without broad-based agreements, the family constitution will likely not even be written—and if it is, will very likely be contested. Ideally, a family constitution would be written when family relationships are strong (or at least not strained), making consensus more likely. All parties should be motivated to reach agreements and develop shared solutions.

In general, a family constitution will include three key sections:

Who is defined as family? As families become larger, sometimes decisions are made specifying who is family and who is not. For example, some families exclude those who marry into the family.
The ideology of the family. This spells out what the family stands for, including its values and objectives.
The reasons for staying together. This details the rationale for managing the joint capital and the benefits of maintaining family cohesion. Factors such as love and concern, along with financial considerations, are usually part of this section.

Important: A family constitution must be seen as a living document, not a static “one and done” agreement. It will likely be important to modify the constitution over time as family circumstances evolve.

Getting help

Gaining consensus requires openness and cooperation among family members. To that end, many wealthy families use facilitators to help them work through the relational issues and the emotions that are often attached to the financial issues. We have seen that conversations around the family money can get very intense, as they often overlap with family history and any acrimony that exists. Social and political differences also make conversations around the family money more complicated. A neutral third-party facilitator can help keep tensions at bay and keep family members focused on agendas instead of anger.

An option for many

In general, a well-crafted family constitution will accomplish several objectives:

◼ Memorialize a family’s principles and values.
Establish checks and balances among different interests, as well as ways to address conflicts and communication protocols.
◼ Promote accountability of family members.
◼ Ensure flexibility so the family can adapt to change.
◼ Provide disenchanted family members with a viable means of exiting.

Best of all: Even though family constitutions are a strategy often employed by the Super Rich, you don’t need millions of dollars to create one for you and yours.

Fidato Wealth LLC is a Registered Investment Adviser. This brochure is solely for informational purposes. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Fidato Wealth LLC and its representatives are properly licensed or exempt from licensure. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Investing involves risk and possible loss of principal capital. No advice may be rendered by Fidato Wealth LLC unless a client service agreement is in place. Copyright 2018 by AES Nation, LLC. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are notified that any review, copying, distribution or use of this transmission is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmission in error, please (i) notify the sender immediately by e-mail or by telephone and (ii) destroy all copies of this message. Please note that trading instructions through email, fax or voicemail will not be taken, as your identity and timely retrieval of instructions cannot be guaranteed.  If you do not wish to receive marketing emails from this sender, please send an email to sayhello@fidatowealth.com.

DOWNLOAD A PDF VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE HERE